What is Aperture? | A Beginner’s Guide to Understanding Aperture

What is Aperture? | A Beginner’s Guide to Understanding Aperture

What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to understanding aperture

3 keys to photography

There are 3 key elements to photography: Aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. These are also known as the exposure triangle. Learning how to use these 3 features on your camera will help you create better photos. In this post we dive deep into one of these elements so you can master how to use it (and then move onto the next 2)!

Related post: The exposure triangle: How to use it to create better photos with your DSLR camera

What is aperture?

Aperture, also known as an F-stop, is how large of an opening you let light through in your camera.

One stop (f-stop) refers to doubling or halving the amount of light making up an exposure. Adding a stop of light by doubling the exposure will brighten an image. Decreasing by one stop or halving the exposure will darken an image.

The smaller the f-stop number (think f/1.4), the larger the aperture. Seems kind of backwards right? This graphic will help you make the connection.

What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to understanding aperture

So the next time you’re wondering which aperture to use in any given lighting situation just think the opposite.

Is it super bright outside? Stick to a smaller aperture (f-stop numbers high like 4 and above). Is it just before sunset and the light is beginning to dim? Use a larger aperture (f-stop with smaller numbers like 2.8 and below).

An important thing to note here is your aperture is entirely dependent on the type of lens you’re using. This is why it’s important to invest in quality glass. You’ll notice most kit lens you receive with your camera don’t go past f/4. This makes it challenging to shoot in low light situations or at night unless you lose a tripod. The larger the aperture (from f/2.8 down to f/1.4), the more light your lens will allow in to capture those night scenes.

A nice side effect of larger apertures (low f-stop numbers) is that creamy bokeh effect. Want to make your subject pop while the background fades beautifully behind? Then use those lower f-stop numbers. On the other hand, if you want your whole scene to be sharp and crystal clear in focus then use a smaller aperture (large f-stop numbers).

When to use a wide aperture / small f-stop

  • Shallow depth of field
  • Creates a “bokeh” effect (that blurry, out of focus look we all love)
  • Low-light situations
  • Night photography

When to use a narrow aperture / large f-stop

  • When you want more of the scene sharp and in focus
  • Group portrait shots
  • Landscapes
  • Long exposure photography

How aperture affects a photo

Here are some example photos showing an aperture progression from f/1.4 to f/22.

f/1.4

At the widest opening of f/1.4 you’ll notice a shallow depth of field, lots of bokeh as the background fades.What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to understanding aperture

f/2.8

Still plenty of bokeh and fade in the background, slightly more in focus.
What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to understanding aperture

f/5.6

More of the scene is in focus.What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to Uu

f/8

Most of the scene is in focus, less background blur with no bokeh effects.What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to understanding aperture

f/14

As the aperture reaches higher numbers, more of the scene is in crystal clear focus.What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to understanding aperture

f/22

At the highest aperture of f/22, you can see the entire scene of the photo.What is aperture? | A beginner's Guide to understanding aperture

 

 


Looking for a little inspiration to get you out there shooting and improving your photography skills?

Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right to your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

Protect Your Images with Photoshop Metadata

Protect Your Images with Photoshop Metadata

Protect your images with Photoshop metadata

 

Have you ever worried about sharing your images on the Internet? Anytime you upload something to the web you risk the chance of your work being used (without permission!) by another.

When you share information on the web it’s always best practice to give credit in the form of a link back to the original source so the reader can find out more information. Taking credit for photography you didn’t shoot yourself or pay for (like stock photography) is plagiarism and should be taken seriously.

As photographers we’re even more concerned with the copyright of our images. This is why it’s a good idea to get into the habit of adding metadata to our images. That way if an image is ever taken from your website or social media the copyright information will be embedded within the image.

You can get as detailed as you like with metadata. Start with adding your name as the creator of the image, website source, and any other contact information you wish to add.

You’ll even see the © copyright symbol when you open the image up in Photoshop, as shown in the screenshot below.

 

Protect your photos: Use Photoshop metadata to add copyright and contact information

What is metadata?

First, you may be wondering what metadata is and why it’s important. You may have already heard all about the amazing benefits of adding metadata but have never tried it yourself or know where to begin. This post will help clear up a few of those confusions.

Metadata is data that describes other data. It helps you organize and retrieve vital information on your image. It also makes the file searchable on the computer and/or Internet.

Metadata can be created manually or automated by a process (like the one I’ll show you below). A few examples of automated metadata are date created, date modified, and file size. These fields automatically populate themselves.

If you take a look at the metadata of a photograph you might be amazed by how much information is captured and stored! You can find out which camera created the file, exposure information, and descriptive information like keywords.

How to add copyright information with Photoshop actions

Before we get into the step-by-step tutorial on how to add copyright information to the metadata of your images, be sure to create a new Photoshop action so you only have to go through this process once. Once you press Play, the Photoshop action performs a series of pre-recorded steps.

The purpose is to create a sequence that can be applied repeatedly, giving you the same results every time. We want to eliminate tedious, repetitive work by automating as much as possible. It’s time-consuming to add these steps to your editing workflow for every photo. Using a Photoshop action will cut down the time.

If you’ve never created or used Photoshop actions before, don’t worry. I’ll go through it one step at a time. By the end of this tutorial you’ll be glad you took the time to set up the workflow and look for more ways to use Photoshop actions to save time in the future!

Step 1: Create a new Photoshop action

After opening an image in Photoshop go to Window > Actions (from the toolbar menu). The actions tab will pop up on your screen. Click Create New Action to start a new workflow.

 

Protect your photos with Photoshop metadata: Step 1 – Create new Photoshop action

 

Step 2: Name your Photoshop action + record

Under Name enter a title for your new action. For this tutorial I named mine Copyright to remind me its purpose. If you want to increase the automation process by a notch, assign a Function Key to trigger the action.

 

Protect your photos with Photoshop metadata: Step 2 – Name Photoshop action and click record

 

When you’re ready click the Record button to start recording.

Note: Anything you do from this point on within Photoshop will be recorded in the action. It’s important to only perform the required steps for this workflow. The point of a Photoshop action is to create a workflow that can work on any image without interruption.

Step 3: Open File Info

Next, go to File > File Info. All the fields in the dialog box should be blank since this is a new document. Take a minute to explore all the options.

 

Protect your photos with Photoshop metadata: Step 3 – File > File Info

 

Step 4: Add your information

Under the Basic tab fill in your name or company name under Author. Change the Copyright Status to Copyrighted, add a copyright notice, and insert the Copyright Info URL. Take a look at the example below to see how to personalize with your information.

Quick tip: To add a © copyright symbol on a Mac press the “alt” or “option” key while typing “g” on the keyboard. To add a © copyright symbol on a PC press the “alt” key while typing “0169” on the keyboard.

 

Protect your photos with Photoshop metadata: Step 4 – Add author name, copyright notice, and URL

 

Notice the Creation Date, Modification Date, Application, and Format. These are examples of automated metadata we mentioned earlier. You can’t modify these fields.

Next, choose the IPTC tab. You’ll notice the Creator field populated itself with the same information you added in the Author field in the previous tab. You can get as detailed as you like by adding information into the fields. If you’re a photographer and want others to know the location of your business you can add a business address.

 

Protect your photos with Photoshop metadata

 

The most important pieces of information you’ll want to add are your email address and website URL (if you have one). That way if someone finds your photo online and falls in love with it, they can contact you and possibly hire you if they’re interested!

Step 5: Add rights usage terms

If you scroll down to the bottom of the IPTC tab you’ll notice the Copyright Notice also populated itself from the information you entered in the Description tab. Under Rights Usage Terms, add All Rights Reserved.

 

Protect your photos with Photoshop metadata: Step 5 – Add "All Rights Reserved."

 

You may want to skim through the other tabs within this dialog to familiarize yourself with what’s available. Feel free to be as detailed or brief as you like. For the purpose of this tutorial, we’re only adding copyright information.

Once you’re done adding your information to the fields click OK. Then click Stop on your Photoshop action tab and you’re done!

Now that you’ve gone through this process once and created a Photoshop action, you’ll never have to do it again. The next time you open a new photo in Photoshop and click Play on the action, it’ll automatically run through the workflow process.

It’s a good idea to test your new Photoshop action a few times with other images to make sure everything runs smoothly. Open a new photo, click Play or use the assigned function key if you specified one. Now you can quickly and easily add copyright information to the metadata of all your images with a click of a button!

Get your Photoshop metadata tutorial guide

 


Photoshop actions can be a huge time saver and create consistency in your photo editing workflow!

Have you ever used or created your own Photoshop actions to help speed up and automate a workflow process? How have you used Photoshop actions?

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Have you ever heard of the exposure triangle? It sounds a little like a math equation, let me explain.

The exposure triangle stands for three elements affecting the exposure of a photograph. If you’re struggling with how to shoot in manual mode, use the exposure triangle as a guide to help you. You can change each one of these variables with your camera to create a different effect.

These three elements of a photograph are:

So let’s break down these three elements a little further to understand how each affects your photos.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Aperture

Aperture, also known as an F-stop, is how large of an opening you let light through in your photo.

A stop refers to doubling or halving the amount of light making up an exposure. Adding a stop of light by doubling the exposure will brighten an image. Decreasing by one stop or halving the exposure will darken an image.

Related post: What is aperture? | A Beginner’s guide to understanding aperture

Here’s a few examples of f-stops you may see on your camera:

  • f/1.4
  • f/2
  • f/2.8
  • f/4
  • f/5.6
  • f/8
  • f/11
  • f/16
  • f/22

So here’s the confusing part. The smaller the f-stop number (think f/1.4), the larger the aperture. Seems kind of backwards right? This illustration will help you make the connection.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

So the next time you’re wondering which aperture to use in any given lighting situation just think the opposite.

Is it super bright out? Stick to a smaller aperture (f-stop numbers high like 4 and above). Is it just before sunset and the light is beginning to dim? Use a larger aperture (f-stop with smaller numbers like 2.8 and below)

An important thing to note here is your aperture is entirely dependent on the type of lens you’re using. This is why it’s important to invest in quality glass.

You’ll notice most kit lens you receive with your camera don’t go past f/4. This makes it challenging to shoot in low light situations or at night unless you lose a tripod. The larger the aperture (from f/2.8 down to f/1.4), the more light your lens will allow in to capture those night scenes.

A nice side effect of larger apertures (low f-stop numbers) is that creamy bokeh effect. Want to make your subject pop while the background fades beautifully behind? Then use those lower f-stop numbers. Here’s an example where the red rose is the subject in focus while the building is blurred into the background.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

On the other hand, if you want your whole scene to be sharp and crystal clear in focus then use a smaller aperture (large f-stop numbers). Notice how the whole scene is in focus in this example. You can see details in the grass and the Painted Ladies in the foreground as you can with San Francisco in the background.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Shutter speed

Shutter speed refers to the amount of time the shutter is open. It’s measured in seconds or fractions of a second. The bigger the denominator, the faster the feed. Example: 1/1000 is a much faster shutter speed than 1/30.

Unless you’re using a tripod you’ll most likely want to stay above 1/60 or 1/125 to be safe.

When you’re wondering what shutter speed to use think about the movement of your scene. The best example I can use to explain this is if you’re capturing a waterfall.

If you want to freeze the water you’ll use a higher shutter speed (think 1/1000 and above). If you want to create motion blur where the water looks silky smooth, you’ll want to have a lower shutter sleep (think 1/15). Here’s an example of a waterfall I shot using a lower shutter speed to show the motion blur of the water.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

But again, remember you’ll need something to stabilize your camera like a tripod otherwise your whole image will be blurry if you go beyond 1/125 while handholding your camera.

You can also create some interesting effects at night with low shutter speeds. This is called lightpainting when you use light to essentially “paint” while the the shutter of your camera is open. Here are more photos of lightpainting with the pixelstick.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

ISO

Back in the days of film photography ISO was how sensitive film was to light. It’s measured in numbers like 100, 200, 400, 800, and so on. You actually had to choose one for a whole roll of 36 exposures. Now we’re lucky to have the option to change for each photo.

The lower the number, the lower the sensitivity of the film and the finer grain. And the reverse, the higher the number the more noticeable the grain.

In general, lower ISOs are used for bright, sunny days and higher ISO for darker situations like at night.

A note to remember: the higher the number (say 3200) the noisier or grainier the image will appear. Most people don’t like this look but it can create an interesting affect if it’s part of your style.

Here’s an example of a photo I took in San Francisco at night with a super high ISO. It has that old school, vintage vibe I love to create in my photos.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Now that you’ve learned more about the exposure triangle, how will you use this to improve your photos while shooting in manual mode? Let me know what is your biggest takeaway from this post!

 

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

Cheat Sheet Guide to VSCO CAM Editing Features

There are so many options to edit your photos with VSCO CAM! It can be overwhelming. I created a cheat sheet to help streamline your mobile editing process.

Everyone loves infographics! Here’s a Pinterest version for you to pin (go ahead, you know you want to)!

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 

A Step by Step Guide to VSCO CAM Editing Features

Editing with VSCO CAM is a two step process. First, choose your preset. Then use the editing panel to fine tune your photo. If this is your first time using VSCO CAM, I highly recommend experimenting with the editing features to get a feel for what they do and how they affect your photos. To access the editing panel, use the wrench icon (to the right of the paintbrush icon).

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Exposure

Exposure adjusts the brightness and darkness of your photo. Usually you only need to adjust this by one or two stops. But to really show the drastic affects of these editing features, I show extreme examples so you can quickly see the impact. The left image is completely underexposed, the shadows of the buildings are now shapes filled with black. The far right image is an example of an over exposed photo. Usually this results in blown out details, notice how the cloud is no longer visible and the top of the Transamerica Pyramid disappears into the sky?

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Contrast

Contrast adjusts the scale of difference between black and white in your photo. Low contrast images, like the one on the left, appear flat and dull since they don’t show a range between lights and darks. They look hazy like a cloud of dust blew into the frame. High contrast images on the other hand, show a full range of tones in shadows and highlights. Photos taken at high noon immediately give a high contrast look without much of a range in tones. When I first started editing photos several years ago, I made the newbie mistake of always cranking the contrast of my images as far up as possible. In time I learned to balance and use it sparingly.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Straighten or Rotate

This tool comes in handy when you want your image to be straight even if the original is off center. It’s great for achieving a straight horizon line in landscape photography. Here are extreme examples of how the straighten tool affects your photos. If you wanted to rotate, click on the icon above the checkmark (a square rotated on its side) to rotate 90 degrees at a time.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Horizontal perspective

Rarely will you need to use the horizontal perspective but it’s a great tool for the right photo. One of the best uses for this tool is in architectural shots. Have you ever looked at a photo of a building unsure what it is but knowing there’s something off about it? Most likely it’s due to the perspective. Use this tool and the next (vertical perspective) to fix those distortions.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Vertical perspective

Just like the horizontal perspective tool above, you’ll rarely need to use this one. It’s best for correcting distortions on architectural shots. A note of caution for both the horizontal and vertical perspective, try not to use it to the extreme. It will lower the quality of your photos as it stretches the pixels.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Crop

With the crop tool there are four aspect ratios to choose from. An uncropped image is 3:4 or 4:3, depending if it’s in portrait or landscape mode. Other options are square (1:1), 4:5, and 2:3 (perfect for photos of tall buildings or if you want to create the illusion of more negative space like in the photo below)!

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Clarity

Clarity increases mid-tone contrast. It also results in lesser noise to the photo than the sharpening tool. It helps bring in more light and detail in this aerial city shot shown below. This tool is best used on buildings, architectural shots, and cityscapes as it brings out texture and details in photos.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Sharpen

The triangle icon sharpens images. 99% of the time I never use sharpening in my images, mobile or other otherwise. I find the effect too harsh. It’s a preference but it may become a part of your style. Sharpening brings out the details, notice how the texture of the mural becomes more prominent in the transition of images below.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Saturation

The example image on the left is completely desaturated, meaning the color is removed. It’s close to a black and white image but not quite, there’s a slight tint. The far right image has way too much saturation, it’s blinding! You can use saturation to bring out or push back the colors in your photos.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Highlights Save

The highlights save tool is great for toning back the brights of your over exposed image. I often use this to adjust skies on outdoor shots. The sky in the image on the left is too flat for my tastes, I prefer the middle option.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Shadows Save

The shadow save tool comes in handy when your image is underexposed. It helps bring back the detail in your shadows. A little goes a long way so I usually adjust by one or two stops. The image on the far right is back to a dull, flat look with not much contrast.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Temperature

I like to adjust temperature by one or two stops if I feel the image is either too cool or too warm. If you prefer cool toned images, rich in blues, push the slider to the left. If you prefer warmer tones, then push the slider to the right. In this sunset image (taken during the golden hour in San Francisco), you can see how temperature affects the colors.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Tint

The tint tool adds either green or purple hues to your photo depending on if you move the slider to the left or right. Since the green color in the mint is a focal point, it helps to enhance the green hue to draw more attention to its details.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Skin Tone

This tool is mainly used to adjust skin tones within portraits but horses have skin tones too! Sliding to the left adds pink tones to the image while sliding to the right adds orange tones. If you love to shoot portraits, you’ll use this feature often!

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Vignette

Vignetting is one of my favorite tools! I use vignettes in 90% of my editing. I love how it draws your attention inward like in this photo where the focal point is the hole in the wood fence. It also adds a lovely gradation of colors in my color photos.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Grain

Another tool I rarely use in mobile photography is grain. I do however, add it to black and white photos from my DSLR. Why? Grain added to mobile images, if you’re not careful, can make your images look poor in quality. Black and white film-like photography while remaining smooth in color is part of my style. Using the grain tool, you can add a level of texture, see the examples below.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Fade

I occasionally use fade by one or two stops on black and white photos to kick back some of the blacks. Too much fade leads to low contrast images and a loss of details like the example on the right.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Shadows Tint

I often gloss over the shadow and highlight tint tools but they can create interest in your images, adding a “vintage” look. A great way to use this tool is to add a level of contrast in the color of your images. In this example, I added an orange shadow tint to complement the blues of the sky. Less is more but you can get really creative with this tool and create some psychedelic photos!

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


 

Highlights Tints

The opposite of the shadows tint, the highlight tints tool adds color to your highlights. Notice how the gold outline of the roses becomes more creamy with the orange tint? Again, you can create some amazing affects with this tool if you experiment.

Guide to VSCO Cam editing features: Free guide included!

 


Looking for a little inspiration to get you out there shooting and improving your photography skills?

Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right to your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

How to Install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass Screen Protector

Installing these screen protectors like the Zagg Invisible Shield Glass can be tricky. If I’m honest, they used to give me a little anxiety. The old versions, before the Invisible Shield Glass was introduced, were extremely difficult to install on your phone. I’d often mess it up by either not aligning correctly, persistent air bubbles, or I’d notice a spec of dust later that would drive me crazy every time I looked at my screen. (Yes, I’m a perfectionist so the slightest fault in my screen protector really bugs me). So I’ve put together a step-by-step tutorial on how to install your Zagg Invisible Shield Glass screen protector on your iPhone including a video tutorial below!

How to order your replacement

After a few months of wear-and-tear, more nicks around the edges and even a small crack or two forming, I gave in and ordered a replacement. Just a note, this is the second replacement I’ve ordered within the year. So unless you’re super gentle with your phone you’ll mostly likely want to replace your glass screen protector at least once a year especially if you’re constantly pulling it in and out of a case. Luckily with the lifetime warranty you’ll only have to pay for shipping (which is $5.99 in the United States) instead of purchasing a new one.

In order to receive a replacement you need to have already registered your product on Zagg’s website (so do this first if you’ve just purchased yours!). Once you login you can navigate to the “Warranty replacement” link on your account dashboard to start the process of ordering a replacement. Below is a screenshot of what you’ll see after login.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

What’s included in the box

Here’s a look at the unopened packaging for Zagg’s Invisible Shield Glass HD Clarity Screen Protection for Apple iPhone 6/6s. What’s included in the box:

  • Instructions on how to register your product’s warranty (mine was already registered, that’s how I received this product replacement so no need to re-register)
  • Wet wipe
  • Microfiber cleaning cloth
  • Invisible Shield Glass screen protector

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step-by-step installation

I created a short step-by-step video tutorial of how to install the Zagg Invisible Shield Glass screen protector. I know when it comes to processes like this it always helps me to have a visual walkthrough so I get it right the first time.

Step 1: Remove old screen protector

If you’re replacing an old screen protector like I am, remove this first.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step 2: Wipe clean with wet wipe

Open the included wet wipe and use it to clean your phone’s screen. You want your screen to be as clean as possible before applying your new Invisible Shield glass screen protector.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step 3: Wipe dry with cloth

This is a very important step for those of you perfectionists (like me). After using the wet wipe to clean your screen use the microfiber cloth to dry. Make sure there are no fingerprints or dust on your screen before moving on.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step 4: Remove side 1 of protective film

Side one of the film is labeled, use the tab to remove. Now that the glass is exposed be careful not to touch the glass or get anything on it.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step 5: Line up carefully (take your time)

This is the second most difficult part of the process and takes me the longest. Align the glass carefully over your phone. Use the home button and the speaker to help with alignment. Take all the time you need to get this right.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step 6: Press down in the center of the screen

Once you have the glass aligned correctly press down in the center of the screen and watch as the glass installs itself.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step 7: Remove protective film

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

Step 8: Press down on any remaining bubbles

Use the cloth to smooth out any remaining bubbles, this make take an extra minute or two.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass

And that’s it, you’re done

Oh so shiny, it looks brand new all over again.

How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass How to install Zagg Invisible Shield Glass


Have you used Zagg’s screen protectors? If so, how has your experience been?

 

Want to join the free photo challenge?

Looking for a way to cultivate your creativity today? Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right in your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

Quick VSCO Cam editing tip: Copy and paste

Quick VSCO Cam editing tip: Copy and paste

Learn how to use this quick VSCO Cam editing tip to streamline your mobile editing process

Copy and paste: VSCO Cam’s hidden tip

It’s no secret I love using VSCO Cam for mobile photography editing. I experiment with photo editing apps on my iPhone often, browsing with curiosity in the Photo/Video category of the app store for what’s “new”, but I’ll always come back to VSCO Cam. VSCO is an art and technology company doing great things in the photography world. Their mission is to empower people everywhere to create, discover, and connect. It’s not about quickly snapping a photo and slapping on a filter. It’s about capturing moments, documenting life, and sharing it with the world. VSCO has really raised the bar in mobile photography and I’m excited to see how VSCO Cam evolves over time.

When I discovered one of VSCO Cam’s newer app updates a few months ago, I was blown away by how much smoother my mobile editing process could be and now is thanks to this feature! Let’s say you’ve taken several photos, you upload them to your VSCO Cam library, and you choose one to enhance and fine tune. You’ve just created an amazing version of this photo and wish you could replicate the effect on similar ones you’ve taken throughout the day. Well, now you can with VSCO’s copy and paste editing feature!

Speed up your editing workflow

Much like the copy and paste function on your computer (or common + c and command + v on a mac!) you have the ability to copy and paste the editing workflow from one photo to another. This is a huge time saver. Not to mention it’s also how I remain consistent with my style on Instagram.

To walk you through the exact process of how to use copy and paste feature in VSCO Cam, I created a short step-by-step video tutorial so you can see this quick VSCO CAM editing tip in action and learn how to use it help streamline your mobile editing process today.

Note: The only thing the copy and paste function does copy is the crop and straighten edits from your photo. This is good news because often times these are the two features that you need to manually adjust for each photo, if at all. Other than that all the exposure, contrast, and even the chosen preset will be transferred to the photos you “paste” the effect onto.

Step-by-step guide to quick editing with VSCO Cam

To learn more about VSCO Cam’s editing feature, you’ll definitely want to check out a recent tutorial post I created on what each of the individual editing features of VSCO Cam has to offer and how you can use them on your own photos.


Have you ever used the copy and paste feature when editing your photos? It’s a great way to create a style and remain consistent among several photos! What are your favorite features in VSCO Cam?