Canon Prime Lens Guide

Canon Prime Lens Guide

Canon prime lenses guide

Prime vs. zoom: How to know which to use

I’m a big advocate for shooting minimally. I’ve shared more on shooting with minimal equipment and why you might want to. When it comes to traveling or spending the day with my camera in San Francisco, I choose to bring as little gear possible. But how do you choose?

When you’re heading out for a day of shooting without much of a plan it’s hard to decide what lens or lenses to bring. Should I bring the telephoto lens so I don’t have to worry about focal length and can zoom in close to my subject? Or should I bring I bring the 50mm prime lens cause I know I’ll need the lower f-stops to take my best photos as the sun sets? What about those speciality lenses like Lensbaby or Petzval? So many choices. Each creating entirely different sets of photos.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art LensLomography Petzval 58mm art lens in brass

We can’t predict the future and know which lens we should bring. We could decide to bring everything but it’s bulky, heavy, and not to mention unsafe on the streets of any city. The more you bring, the less creative you are. If I commit to bringing one or two lenses at most I’ll make them work in every situation.

If you’re just starting out and you only have one lens it’s actually a good thing. It means you’ll push yourself to be creative with how you capture your photos. You’ll learn what works and what doesn’t and focus on doing your best with what you have.

What is a prime lens?

A prime lens is a lens with a fixed focal length. When I first heard about prime lenses I immediately shrugged them off as I wanted the convenience and flexibility of zoom lenses, you might be thinking the same.

Prime lenses are faster and have a larger maximum aperture. Most typical 18-55mm kit zoom lenses have a maximum aperture of f/4 or f/5.6 depending on the focal length. If you use a prime lens like the 50mm f/1.4 lens, your aperture is four stops faster. That sounds good but what does it really mean?

With larger apertures you can take better photos in low light conditions without a tripod. The other great advantage is the range in depth of field. All those photos with beautifully blurred backgrounds (also known as bokeh)? They’re created with wider aperture settings like those on a prime lens.

Starting with a kit zoom lens

The first lenses I ever bought were two kit lenses for a Nikon D40 back in 2007. I made the same buying decision when I switched a year later to the Canon Rebel xSi.

I bought these lenses for one reason. I thought they were a good deal. They were cheaper together and it seemed like I could capture any shot with them. I was wrong. For those first few lens purchases I only considered focal length. But there’s so many more important factors to consider.

After a couple years of experimenting with these lenses I realized their limitations. I could never shoot good photos at night unless I had a tripod. But that takes forethought and personally I dislike walking around the city with a tripod. Nothing makes you stick out more than setting up a tripod.

The point of a street photographer is not to stand out. You need to blend into your surroundings so you can capture the scene as it is. It’s just like asking a person to “smile” when you take their photo. It’s a guarantee for shooting the most inauthentic portrait ever. The same is true with street photography.

Canon zoom lens EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USMCanon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM Lens for Canon EOS SLR Cameras

The other drawback of these kit lenses are the focus and mood I wanted to create but couldn’t. At some point your level of skill in photography will surpass your equipment. When you find yourself frustrated and unable to create the photo you have in mind, you know it’s time to invest in better equipment.

However, I don’t recommend you start with the most expensive lenses as a beginner. Instead, grow with your equipment. If you don’t start by experimenting with a standard zoom kit lens, you’ll never learn what features you care most about. Reaching a level of frustration is a good thing, it means you’re learning and progressing.

So what do you do when your kit lens is no longer cutting it? You choose a prime lens.

Which prime lens should you buy first?

Remember when I said I only focused on focal length when choosing my first lens? You probably did too and I know why. You want the one lens, the “unicorn” to do it all for you. You want to be able to shoot wide angle cityscapes or landscapes as well as zoom in to capture the details. But the harsh reality is this unicorn doesn’t exist.

If it does exist (or will in the near future), it’ll be extremely expensive and heavy to carry. You might not think about the size or weight of your equipment right away but after an hour or two of shooting, you’ll feel it in the strain of your neck and shoulders.

This is why you need multiple lenses for multiple shooting purposes. Again, you’ll only learn what you need in a given situation through practice, trial and error. Each lens serves a purpose and creates a different mood or type of photo.

If you find you prefer shooting wide open spaces, you may want to invest in a 24mm lens or 35mm lens. Is your main focus portraits? The 85mm lens is what you’re after. Or if you’re like me and love to shoot in cities, you may find the 50mm prime lens to be an ideal focal length for 95% of your shots.

Want a more affordable option? Check out the Canon 40mm f/2.8 STM prime lens, also known as the “pancake lens” for its compact size. It’s on the lower-end of pricing, still offers a wide focal length and bonus! Its weight and size makes it an ideal option for traveling.

Canon 40mm f/2.8 STM prime lensCanon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM “Pancake” Lens

Complete Canon EF prime lens guide

To help you choose which prime lens to start with first, I’ve created this infographic as a quick reference guide to help you choose! This guide includes all Canon prime lenses, which is what I shoot with and recommend.

Canon prime lenses guide

#1 recommendation: The “nifty fifty” or 50mm

The 50mm is the number one lens recommendation I’d heard about before I even considered prime lenses. So many rave about it in online reviews. Most who buy it say it’s their favorite lens, use it all the time, and can’t imagine shooting without it.

I agree completely. Ever since I purchased the 50mm prime lens, I never leave for a photo adventure without it.

Canon prime lens guide: The 50mm f/1.4 prime lensCanon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Standard Lens for Canon SLR Cameras

What’s to love about the 50mm prime lens

It’s lightweight and compact. The perfect companion for street photography as it’s not conspicuous and it doesn’t strain my neck while walking around for hours.

50mm is the happy medium of focal lengths. 24mm and 35mm is too wide for most situations unless you shoot landscape and interior spaces only. 85mm is zoomed too far in and I don’t shoot portraits. So 50mm is the closest you’ll get to meeting both worlds.

Most importantly, it allows me to take the photos I’ve dreamt of but simply can’t with a standard zoom or telephoto lens. I crave the smooth, creamy bokeh effects of wider apertures like f/1.4 (and I’m not afraid to admit I mostly shoot at f/1.4 when the situation permits). It creates natural vignettes that draw you into the city scenes I capture.

With this lens I can easily shoot clear and focused photos during the golden hour and long after into the night. I couldn’t shoot the bright lights of San Francisco’s streets without my 50mm. Like this one!

San Francisco cityscape skyline from Fort PointSan Francisco cityscape skyline from Fort Point

The Canon prime lens guide

With so many choices for your first prime lens, it’s easy to get them confused. To help out I’ve created a downloadable guide for you. Enter your info below and I’ll send it to you!


Looking for a little inspiration to get you out there shooting and improving your photography skills?

Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right to your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

Film is making a comeback

In a world of never-ending “selfies”, cat gifs, and the constant scrolling and swiping in social media, we’re overwhelmed with visuals daily. It’s never been easier to photograph the moments of our lives. But there’s something special about holding one of these “moments” in your hands. I’ve shared some of these physical memories with the Fujifilm Instax Mini but recently I added this little gem to my camera collection, the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera.

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

There’s three main types of cameras and each has their own creative constraints. The most recent in the evolution of photography is the digital camera. Most of us own some sort of digital camera whether it’s a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex), mirrorless, or an iPhone. With digital we take a photo and immediately afterward we see the result.

Long before digital lived the traditional film camera. Film cameras ranged from large format, medium format, to the more common 35mm. Depending on the lighting situation you wanted to take photos in you’d have to get film with a certain ISO or film speed. Want to use your camera to capture photos on a bright and sunny day around the city? You’ll need a roll of film with ISO 100 or 200. But as the sun fades into the evening you need to change to a roll of film with a higher ISO. Want to learn more about ISO and how it affects your photography? Read about it here in this post on Understanding the Exposure Triangle.

Introducing the Polaroid instant film camera

In between traditional film and digital is the beloved instant film camera. These types of cameras use self-developing film to create a print soon after taking the photo. Polaroid was the first company to pioneer and patent consumer-friendly instant cameras and film. Edwin Land, founder of Polaroid, unveiled the first commercial instant camera in 1948. The model 95 Land Camera sold at the Jordan Marsh department store in Boston for $89.95. It became the prototype for all Polaroid Land cameras for the next 15 years. Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing: 1948 advertisement for PolaroidPolaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing Source: Polaroid Land Camera Model 95a

Unboxing the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera

Now for the unveiling. See everything included when unboxing the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera, what’s included, and how to insert the first pack of film. You’ll also see how to install the frog tongue (a little tricky, it may take a few tries!) which helps protect your film from light as the photo ejects from your camera.

Why I chose this Polaroid camera model

So why the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera vs. any of the other 600-series or SX-70 cameras? For the longest time I couldn’t decide between the Polaroid SX-70 and 600 series. What I love most about the SX-70 series are the design elements including how it folds down and is fully collapsible. I’m not a big fan of most of the 600 series designs, they’re much larger and boxier which makes it difficult to carry around the city. So when I found a 600 series with a foldable/collapsible feature and a design I loved, I knew the SLR 680 model was for me. Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing The other reason I lean toward the 600 series cameras is they have more options when it comes to film. Impossible Project offers original color film with white or black frames, black and white film with white or black frames. For a dramatic effect you can try out the duochrome film packs in red, orange, yellow. And they also offer color film for color frames, round frames, and even gold and silver frames! Here are the first two shots I’ve taken with the Polaroid SLR 680 camera. These were shot in San Francisco using the Impossible Project black and white film with black frames. More to come soon! San Francisco in black and white Polaroid 600 type film

How to use 600 type film with SX-70 cameras

There’s simply so much more opportunity to be creative with 600 type film rather than the SX-70 series which only offers color and black and white film with white frames. But I’ve done some research and there is a hack. If you did nothing and just inserted the 600-series film into your SX-70 film your photos would be overexposed (too bright). This is because the SX-70 is four times more sensitive to light. The best way to correct this is to use a neutral density film pack filter. This allows you to use any Impossible 600 type film in your SX-70 camera. How to use 600 type film with SX-70 Cameras Source: Filmpack filter twinpack by Impossible Project

Camera specs and features

Here are the camera specs and features for the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera:

  • Folding SLR instant camera
  • 4-element 116mm f/8 glass lens
  • Minimum focus is 10.4 inches
  • Aperture range of f/8 – f/22
  • Electronic variable speed/aperture shutter
  • Polaroid Sonar autofocus
  • Switch from auto to full manual focus
  • Built in automatic flash (with override)
  • Lighten/darken wheel
  • Works with Impossible 600 type film
  • No batteries required

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

 


Looking for a little inspiration to get you out there shooting and improving your photography skills?

Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right to your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

Lomography Petzval 58 lens unboxing

Lomography Petzval 58 lens unboxing

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

Lomography Pezval 58 lens Kickstarter campaign

Last year I took part in a Lomography’s Kickstarter campaign for the new Petzval 58 lens. This is by far the most beautiful lens I’ve ever owned. It’s also quite heavy which is to be expected. I’ll be experimenting with it and posting photos from created with this lens and also more about it as I get familiar with it.

Whenever I find unique photo gear making their debut on Kickstarter campaigns I’m pretty much sold right away. It’s usually the best price the product will ever be and sometimes you gets some cool bonuses along the way if the campaign is successful. Unfortunately I lucked out on the $375 super early bird launch deal, by the time I found out about the lens I got it at the next tier of $450. But hey that’s still better than the retail price it is today of $749! That’s more than double and I doubt shipping is included.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

What’s in the box

  • New Petzval 58 Bokeh Control Art Lens
  • Waterhouse aperture plates (the first eight shown below ranging from the small to large circles)
  • Front and rear lens cap
  • Lens pouch
  • Cleaning cloth
  • Photo book
  • Instruction manual

Extras included from the Kickstarter campaign

  • 5 prints, photographs taken with the Petzval 48 lens
  • 4 experimental aperture plate kit (the bottom row of four shown below), backers were able to vote on 4 shapes out of 11 possible choices

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

The unboxing film

Curious what this lens looks like? I created a short unboxing film to share the experience with you. You’ll also see all the included accessories. A few were extras part of the Kickstarter campaign that wouldn’t be included if you purchased the lens today (like the 5 prints and the special shaped aperture plates).

The shiny details

The photo book showcases stunning examples of photography created with this exact Petzval lens. There’s a section on tips and tricks, also gives a short history of the lens and Lomography the company.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

The instruction manual, super designed. Languages included: English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, Chinese, and Korean.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

The fives prints included as part of the Kickstarter campaign. My favorites are the black and white dancer and the portrait of the two women.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

The other bonus from the Kickstarter campaign were a set of 4 experimental aperture plates and came in this compact box.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

All aperture plates including the experimental ones. Notice how the circular ones range from tiny to large? You may recognize the how this relates to the aperture of your camera (larger adds more light, smaller takes away).

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

Introducing the Petzval 58 bokeh control art lens

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

So what’s so special about this lens? What can it do that your standard Canon or Nikon lenses can’t?

Bokeh effects like no other

This lens is known for it’s bokeh effects. Use the ring on the lens to control your bokeh effects much like you would the focus ring on your typical lens. You can even get that swirly bokeh effect impossible to achieve with any other lens (maybe with the help of Photoshop but that takes all the fun out of it).

Related post: Lensbaby photography is another form of bokeh photography

58mm focal length and f/1.9 aperture

The new Petzval 58 lens has a maximum aperture of f/1.9 at the 58mm focal length. It’s a great lens for any occasion including cityscapes (my specialty), landscapes, portraits, and so much more.

Premium Russian glass optics in a beautiful brass body

Ok I like to call it gold but technically I went with the brass option although you can choose black. But I thought, why choose the ordinary option for an extraordinary lens? And I do realize I’ll stick out like a sore thumb while using this lens in public though. Whichever finish you choose, the design still reflects the original 19th century Petzval lenses.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

Love the touch of the engraved logo on the lens cap.

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens UnboxingLomography Petzval 58 Art Lens UnboxingLomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

Examples of bokeh photography with the Petzval 58 lens

Until I experiment myself with this lens on San Francisco’s streets, here’s some examples of what’s possible with this lens from other photographers (photo source).

Lomography Petzval 58 Art Lens Unboxing

Have you experimented with any of Lomography’s cameras or lenses? What do you think of the Petzval 58 lens and its emerging genre of photography?

 

 


Looking for a little inspiration to get you out there shooting and improving your photography skills? Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right to your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

Shooting with minimal photography gear

Shooting with minimal photography gear

Shooting with Minimal Photography Gear: Do More with Less

If you’re still new to photography it’s easy to become a gear addict. Embracing the idea of shooting with minimal photography gear is the farthest from your mind. You wonder if you should you use a cropped or full-sensor camera. What about those L-series lens (if you’re a Canon-user)? Should you use a zoom, telephoto, or prime lens? There’s so many categories and subcategories. One could go bankrupt chasing the greatest gear. While I do love experimenting with new gadgets and gear for my camera and even try out new editing software, I tend to lean towards shooting minimally.

Benefits of shooting with minimal photography gear

When I’m traveling around and my focus is street and signage photography, I prefer to bring as little gear as possible. My camera body (the Canon 5D Mark III), the 50mm f/1.4 prime lens, and my beloved iPhone. Occasionally I’ll bring another specialty lens like a Lensbaby but 9 times out of 10 I usually stick with my core three pieces of gear, here are a few reasons why.

Shooting with Minimal Photography Gear: Do More with Less

Ease of use

For one, when you’re out on location ease of use is of the utmost importance. When I see something I want to shoot, I don’t have time to switch lenses so I have to make what I have in my hands work for the moment. I also like the creative constraints and the challenge it brings. It’s easy to get a perfect shot when you have the top of the line equipment but doing so with less is much more challenging and satisfying when done right.

Safety first

Another big issue is safety. When you’re on the streets of any major city it’s important to not stand out. You don’t want to be the one with a huge camera, a long telephoto lens, plus a tripod. Everyone stares and suddenly it’s that much harder to capture scenes natively. I like to blend in with the environment and capture events as they happen. When someone knows there’s a camera on them they act differently. It’s like being on your best behavior while your parents are watching. It’s not you 100% of the time. It’s a part you play.

The more attention you call out, the more “expensive” your equipment looks, the more prone you are to theft. If you’re shooting solo like I do most of the time, it’s a good idea not to bring your best equipment with you on the streets. So leave that L-series lens at home when the version below will do just fine.

Master your gear: Do more with less

Shooting with minimal photo gear also forces you to do better with what you have. If you’re constantly trying out new gear you’ll never have time to master it. It’s a skill and one that can be learned. Have one lens as your constant, the one you’ll use if you have only one choice. Over time you’ll learn everything about it. How to push it to the limits, when to step back, and most importantly shooting manually will become second nature.

When you’re familiar with your camera, your lens, and your settings, somehow your fingers instinctively know what to do in any given situation. It’s a bright sunny day? Ok make sure the ISO is at 100 or 200. You’re trying to freeze a moving subject? You adjust for a faster shutter speed. Need the camera to bring in as much light as possible while the sun is setting? Open up the aperture.

It sounds like a lot to think about all the different scenarios that go into play with every situation but I promise it comes easier with practice and choosing to shoot minimally. One day someone will ask you how do you know what settings to use and you’ll look back in awe because the process has become one with you, like breathing or blinking.

Shooting with Minimal Photography Gear: Do More with Less

Why prime and not zoom?

So you might be wondering if I choose one lens to shoot with why do I go with the 50mm lens and not a standard zoom lens? It all comes down to preference and experience. In time you’ll develop your own style and your go-to lens may differ from mine but it’s a good one to go with if you’re at a loss for where to start.

I prefer to get in close to a scene, 50mm is the perfect focal length for the images I see in my mind. Of course there are times where I wish I could zoom in closer or farther away but in those cases I use my feet. I walk up closer to the scene to frame it as I see best or I back up when possible to allow for a few more key details.

Aside from zoom and cropping, the most important feature at any given time is the aperture. I absolutely love shooting with wider apertures and I often push the lens to the extreme and shoot in f/1.4 if the conditions can handle it. I’m more of a sunset and night shooter so shooting with a lower aperture is key unless you’re standing around with a tripod which isn’t how I like to travel most of the time.

Choose minimal photography gear based on your style

My style is dark and not necessarily everything needs to be in full focus. I prefer the natural vignette and bokeh effects that result when using a lower aperture. Yes, you can achieve similar effects and manipulate in post-processing but it’s important to get your vision done right in camera. It also saves you a huge headache later when you realize you didn’t get what you needed on location.

These stylistic cues may not be what you’re looking for in photography and that’s ok. It’s only through time and experimentation you’ll figure out what lens serves you the best 90% of the time. For many years I started out with a Canon Rebel XSI and two standard zoom lenses, 18-50mm and 50-200mm. This gear taught me a great deal about photography but I didn’t really discover my style until I purchased my first prime lens, that nifty 50. My world changed. Suddenly all the images I saw in my head I could now bring to life. That gap from what I saw and what I created grew smaller with each photo because I found the gear that works best for me.

Shooting minimally, one camera, one lens. It’s my photography toolkit, it works for me. Now, what works for you?


 

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

Interested in learning more and improving your photography skills? Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right in your inbox! Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 camera: The unboxing

Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 camera: The unboxing

Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Film Camera: The Unboxing

Adventures in Instant Film Photography: the Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Camera

Anytime I get a new piece of photo gear or experiment with new software or apps, I love to share more about it with you here on the blog. In one of my past weekly letters I wrote about my return to analog/film photography (if you want to be the first to hear about new photo gear, creative projects in the works, and improve your photo skills then you don’t want to miss out so sign up here!).

I recently returned to the instant photography genre with one of these mini Instax cameras! There are several versions of this type of camera including various colors but I like the look of this one best. Check out the unboxing video I created for the Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 camera below and let me know what you think!

So what does this cute little camera do? The Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 camera has a few advanced features including bulb and double exposures (can’t wait to experiment more with these)! It also has new functions and features like a macro mode and high performance flash (although, I don’t recommend using on-camera flash ever, instead use the brightness control to compensate for the brightness and darkness).

More photo gear to explore

If you want to check out more awesome photo gear including unboxing and assembly videos then you’ll definitely want to check out the Moment Case and Lenses. Moment creates amazing products helping you improve your mobile photography. I participated in one of their Kickstarter campaigns last year for their first version of the Moment case specifically designed for their lenses. Check out the unboxing and the set up of the case and lenses here!

Another recent bit of photo gear I shared about is the Intuos Pro Wacom Tablet. Wacom tablets give you better precision and control over your creative work. You can paint, draw, and sketch with ease as if you are applying pen to paper. The number one advantage of the tablet is the pressure-sensitive grip pen which gives you more options when editing in Photoshop. For example, the harder you press down with the pen the broader the brush stroke will be. I’ll be showing you more of what you can do with the Wacom tablet in the coming weeks so keep coming to see more!

Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Camera: The UnboxingFujifilm Instax Mini 90 Camera: The Unboxing

 


Have you experimented with using instant cameras like the Fujifilm Instax or Polaroid? If so, what did you like most about it?

 

Unboxing Intuos Pro Wacom tablet

Unboxing Intuos Pro Wacom tablet

Unboxing Intuos Pro Wacom Tablet

Introducing the Intuos Pro Wacom Tablet

What is a Wacom tablet?

With a Wacom tablet you have better precision and control over your creative work. You can paint, draw, and sketch with ease as if you were applying pen to paper. One of the advantages is the pressure-sensitive grip pen. This means you have more options when editing in Photoshop. For example, the harder you press down with the pen the broader the brush stroke will be.

Wacom tablets are a number 1 tool for photo retouchers (I honestly don’t know how you can do retouching well without it). If you’ve ever been frustrated while using any of the brush related tools in Photoshop, get a Wacom tablet and you will notice an immediate difference (and less stress).

The Unboxing

Here’s a video I filmed for unboxing the Intous Pro Wacom Tablet. Want to know what it looks like and what you get when you buy the small Intuos Pro Wacom tablet? Take a look at the unboxing video below to find out!

The Product

Here are some product photos of the Wacom tablet I purchased. This is the small version which measures at about 12.6 x 8.2 in.Unboxing Intuos Pro Wacom TabletUnboxing Intuos Pro Wacom TabletUnboxing Intuos Pro Wacom TabletUnboxing Intuos Pro Wacom TabletUnboxing Intuos Pro Wacom TabletUnboxing Intuos Pro Wacom Tablet

 


Have you ever used a Wacom tablet? If so, how do you use yours?

 

Photo credit: All product photos shown above on white backgrounds are from Wacom.