Top 10 Photos of 2016: How to Choose Your Best Photos

Top 10 Photos of 2016: How to Choose Your Best Photos

Top 10 Photos of 2016: How to Choose Your Best Photos for the Year

Choosing your annual top 10 photos

2016 has come and gone. With the new year comes new goals and resolutions. But before we completely leave 2016 in the dust let’s reflect on how we’ve grown in photography.

I’m a podcast addict. Like a weekly television show most of my favorite podcasts come out with new episodes weekly and it’s something I look forward. One of them is the Photo Taco podcast from the Improve Photography network. What I love about this podcast is even though it’s actually quite technical in subject matter, the host Jeff Harmon breaks it down simply. Plus, the name fascinates me.

A couple weeks ago I listened to one episode in particular and it inspired some action in me I’d share with you. If you’re interested in listening to the full podcast episode it’s called Why and How of Annual Top 10. But here’s a quick summary and how you can take part too.

The general idea is to choose the top 10 photos you’ve taken throughout the year

I take thousands of photos throughout the year (and with several different cameras including my iPhone) so when I first heard about this concept I knew it wouldn’t be an easy process. But after listening to the episode it’s something I intend on doing for 2016 and every year after. Here’s a few good reasons why you might want to join in too.

1. It forces you to be a better photographer

By looking back objectively on your photos throughout the year you’re forcing yourself to be extremely critical of your photos. Over time you’ll also learn what works and what doesn’t work, what you like and what you don’t. This is key to developing your own photography style over time. You’re only going to get there by shooting thousands of photos.

Ideally you’ll be doing this process as you take photos throughout the year which will make it easier to choose by the end of 2017. But we’re at the beginning of a new year so we have to review ALL photos. Again, it’s no easy task but it’s worth it to go through this exercise.

2. It helps you develop your personal style

When you start reviewing your photos on a regular basis you’ll notice patterns. Maybe you have one subject in particular you shoot over and over (like me and the Golden Gate). Maybe it’s a place, a time of day, or specific color palette. Whatever it is you’ll only begin to connect the dots when you look back on all your photos.

3. You’ll develop a portfolio

Creating an online portfolio of your photography might be the furthest thing from your mind right now especially if you’re still learning the ins and outs of your camera. But I promise if you start with this process early, it makes creating a portfolio stress-free later on. Even if it’s on a private site for your eyes only, the benefits of culling and creating a portfolio are powerful.

4. You appreciate how far you’ve come

This is the most important. If we don’t look back on our progress every once in awhile it’s hard to see how far we’ve come already. I know I’m always concerned with getting better, improving, moving on to be better and creating my best. But sometimes we need to stop, breathe, and appreciate how far we’ve come.


My annual top 10 photos of 2016

So what final top 10 photos made the cut? It took a couple rounds of elimination but these are the final 10 photos I’m truly proud I created in 2016.

 

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Long exposure of San Francisco’s Golden Gate

Is it any surprise the first top 10 photo is of the Golden Gate? Didn’t think so. This shot was taken from Vista Point in Sausalito one winter evening last January. It’s one of my favorite spots to breathe in the views of San Francisco and the Golden Gate. It tends to be quite crowded with tourists during the day but dies down in the evenings.

I set up my tripod, an essential for capturing a photo like this at night, and tested out a few combination of camera settings before getting it right with this one. Long exposures are great for achieving those twinkling lights and the streams of light as the cars drive by.

Tips to create your own long exposure shots at night:

  • Use a tripod or set your camera on a stable surface. If your camera moves at all the shot will come out blurry instead of crisp and clear like this shot.
  • The key is to experiment with shutter and aperture until you reach an end result you’re happy with. First change the shutter speed. Try 1, 2, 3 seconds and notice how it changes the lighting in your photo. The shutter speed for this shot was 4 seconds.
  • You also have to be mindful of aperture. Most of the time I shoot around f/1.4 because I like the creamy bokeh and vignette effects it brings to my photos. However, using this setting at night with such a long shutter speed would cause the photo to be too bright and overexposed. So experiment with higher aperture numbers like f/8 as I used here.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Silhouettes of San Francisco’s Skyline at high noon

Normally, shooting at high noon is my least favorite time for photographing. All the pros agree, the lighting is the least flattering. But with some enhancements in the post-editing process I achieved my signature moody effect despite the shooting conditions. With the contrast of day’s lighting, San Francisco’s skyline really pops yet is subtle int his composition.

Tips for shooting your best photos midday: 

  • Use the “bad” lighting to your advantage. How can you use it to create a dramatic and intriguing photo?
  • Focus on the darkening the highlights and shadows of your photo in post-processing / editing phase.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

#WestCoastBestCoast the dreamy California coast

Born and raise, I’m a true Californian. I have immense pride for where I came from, the bay area. So I never shy away from sharing this theme of love and pride for California in my photography and of course it would make it in my top 10 photos.

In March of 2016 I flew down to Southern California for a short trip, see more photos and video footage of this aerial experience here. As I mentioned in the post, flying can be a surreal experience. You experience some of the most humbling thoughts along with the views.

Tips for shooting your own aerial photos: 

  • We can’t always be on an airplane to catch these amazing views (although I always have my camera ready when the opportunity strikes). So look for other ways to take “aerial” inspired photos. Maybe you climb a few flights of stairs and photograph the view below.
  • The point is to get your to look at your surroundings with new eyes and constantly experiment shooting in different angles: above, below, from one side to another.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Minimal, with a touch of flash

Signage is also theme in my photography and what better place to capture it then the city of Las Vegas, Nevada? I also love to take simple, minimal shots like this one of Harrah’s on the Vegas strip. In combination with the classic, black and white film editing it’s a great addition to this top 10 of 2016.

Tips for shooting your own minimal shots: 

  • Isolate an object, a building, a sign, or any subject of your choosing.
  • Focus on a few key details and get rid of all other distractions.
  • The background is just as important as the foreground so don’t ignore either.
  • Keep color in mind too (or revert to black and white like this one), choosing to focus on a few key colors. Your mind should feel calm and at ease when you view these carefully composed shots.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Lines and shapes

Another photo taken from the same trip to Vegas is this one of the infamous Paris balloon. I love the simple lines and shapes and the elegance of Paris in script.

Tips for shooting your own simple line and shape compositions:

  • Notice everything around you.
  • Perspective is key.
  • Try zooming in or out to focus on a particular detail.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Abstracted from reality, in a daze

I LOVE creating abstract images that confuse and/or make you gaze at something a little longer. Also shot in Las Vegas, this was part of some game I saw as I walked through a shop. I saw the reflecting lights and movement. There’s so many layers and levels to this photo and it works best in a contrast of black and white.

Tips for creating your own abstract photos:

  • Again, notice everything around you.
  • You’ll never know when a photo opportunity will present itself so always be ready with your camera.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Vintage San Francisco

I have an affinity for all these vintage, from another time and place. From “I Love Lucy” to Elvis Presley, vinyl records, 1950s Cadillacs and drive-in theatres. It’s true your strongest passions and experiences will eventually find their way into your style of photography. I’ve often wished I could go back in time and live in San Francisco in the 1950s / 1960s. So recreating it with my camera is the second best.

This San Francisco city scene is shot from the Alta Plaza park in Pacific Heights. The quant, Victorian houses of San Francisco’s neighborhoods, the Sutro tower in the distance, and never ending line of parallel parked cars; this is San Francisco.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Dizzy with color

Of course, another abstracted addition to the top 10 photos. This one is from downtown San Rafael, a place I now call home. I love the signage of the “Double Rainbow” cafe and I love it even more when blown out of focus :)

Tips for shooting your own creative bokeh photos:

  • Bokeh photography is by far the easiest to genre to explore. You simply adjust your photo until it’s out of focus. Experiment with manual focus on your camera on bright lights at night and see what compelling compositions you create!
  • The key is to focus on lighting which is why these photos are best shot at night. Shooting with a fixed/prime lens like the 50mm and using lower aperture is best for these shots.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Moody blues

A favorite experimental lens I occasionally shoot with is a Lensbaby. Think of this style of photography as an extreme version of bokeh. How the lens works is you have one very small focus, in this case the Sutro tower in the distance, while the rest of the scene fades in focus. I find this lens works best when used at night, the city lights add to the effect. You can experiment and truly create some unique images. Here’s a series of photos I created with the mobile Lensbaby on an iPhone.

Top 10 Photos of 2016

Finish what you started

Now for the last of the top 10 photos of 2016. I started with the Golden Gate so I figured I had to end with it too. I mentioned Vista Point above being one of my favorite spots to capture the whole city from afar but the view from Marin Headlands is by far the best. If you’d like to experience the view for yourself, check out the film footage in this post here.

I’ve soaked in the view from this spot many times and it never gets old. Day or night, no matter when you go you’ll never experience the same view twice. I love the strength of the Golden Gate in this shot, it stands tall and upright as it protects the city from harm.

 

How to choose your annual top 10 photos

Want to take part in this exercise too? There’s only two rules:

  1. The photos MUST be shot from January 1, 2016 – December 31, 2016. If you took the photo in 2015 but edited it in 2016, it doesn’t count. 2016 photos only!
  2. Choose your top 10 photos overall. This may be tough if you shoot many genres (landscapes, portraits, cityscapes, to name a few) but choose your top from all, not 10 for each category.

Tips to keep up with your top 10 photos for next year:

  • Going forward the best way to help you keep your best shots in mind for 2017’s top 10 best photos is to use a rating system, if you don’t already.
  • Whether you use Adobe Bridge or Adobe Lightroom to navigate the catalog of your photo collection, be critical through the selection phase of editing. Rate all your photos with 2, 3, 4, or even 5 stars.
  • Then when you get to the end of the year your first round of top 10 is already done for you – those 4 and 5 star photos.
  • From there you keep eliminating until you reach the final 10 you’re most proud of.

I’d love to know more about your experience with choosing your top 10 photos of the year. Let me know in the comments below!

 


Looking for a little inspiration to get you out there shooting and improving your photography skills?

Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right to your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

Film is making a comeback

In a world of never-ending “selfies”, cat gifs, and the constant scrolling and swiping in social media, we’re overwhelmed with visuals daily. It’s never been easier to photograph the moments of our lives. But there’s something special about holding one of these “moments” in your hands. I’ve shared some of these physical memories with the Fujifilm Instax Mini but recently I added this little gem to my camera collection, the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera.

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

There’s three main types of cameras and each has their own creative constraints. The most recent in the evolution of photography is the digital camera. Most of us own some sort of digital camera whether it’s a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex), mirrorless, or an iPhone. With digital we take a photo and immediately afterward we see the result.

Long before digital lived the traditional film camera. Film cameras ranged from large format, medium format, to the more common 35mm. Depending on the lighting situation you wanted to take photos in you’d have to get film with a certain ISO or film speed. Want to use your camera to capture photos on a bright and sunny day around the city? You’ll need a roll of film with ISO 100 or 200. But as the sun fades into the evening you need to change to a roll of film with a higher ISO. Want to learn more about ISO and how it affects your photography? Read about it here in this post on Understanding the Exposure Triangle.

Introducing the Polaroid instant film camera

In between traditional film and digital is the beloved instant film camera. These types of cameras use self-developing film to create a print soon after taking the photo. Polaroid was the first company to pioneer and patent consumer-friendly instant cameras and film. Edwin Land, founder of Polaroid, unveiled the first commercial instant camera in 1948. The model 95 Land Camera sold at the Jordan Marsh department store in Boston for $89.95. It became the prototype for all Polaroid Land cameras for the next 15 years. Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing: 1948 advertisement for PolaroidPolaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing Source: Polaroid Land Camera Model 95a

Unboxing the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera

Now for the unveiling. See everything included when unboxing the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera, what’s included, and how to insert the first pack of film. You’ll also see how to install the frog tongue (a little tricky, it may take a few tries!) which helps protect your film from light as the photo ejects from your camera.

Why I chose this Polaroid camera model

So why the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera vs. any of the other 600-series or SX-70 cameras? For the longest time I couldn’t decide between the Polaroid SX-70 and 600 series. What I love most about the SX-70 series are the design elements including how it folds down and is fully collapsible. I’m not a big fan of most of the 600 series designs, they’re much larger and boxier which makes it difficult to carry around the city. So when I found a 600 series with a foldable/collapsible feature and a design I loved, I knew the SLR 680 model was for me. Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing The other reason I lean toward the 600 series cameras is they have more options when it comes to film. Impossible Project offers original color film with white or black frames, black and white film with white or black frames. For a dramatic effect you can try out the duochrome film packs in red, orange, yellow. And they also offer color film for color frames, round frames, and even gold and silver frames! Here are the first two shots I’ve taken with the Polaroid SLR 680 camera. These were shot in San Francisco using the Impossible Project black and white film with black frames. More to come soon! San Francisco in black and white Polaroid 600 type film

How to use 600 type film with SX-70 cameras

There’s simply so much more opportunity to be creative with 600 type film rather than the SX-70 series which only offers color and black and white film with white frames. But I’ve done some research and there is a hack. If you did nothing and just inserted the 600-series film into your SX-70 film your photos would be overexposed (too bright). This is because the SX-70 is four times more sensitive to light. The best way to correct this is to use a neutral density film pack filter. This allows you to use any Impossible 600 type film in your SX-70 camera. How to use 600 type film with SX-70 Cameras Source: Filmpack filter twinpack by Impossible Project

Camera specs and features

Here are the camera specs and features for the Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera:

  • Folding SLR instant camera
  • 4-element 116mm f/8 glass lens
  • Minimum focus is 10.4 inches
  • Aperture range of f/8 – f/22
  • Electronic variable speed/aperture shutter
  • Polaroid Sonar autofocus
  • Switch from auto to full manual focus
  • Built in automatic flash (with override)
  • Lighten/darken wheel
  • Works with Impossible 600 type film
  • No batteries required

Polaroid SLR 680 instant film camera unboxing

 


Looking for a little inspiration to get you out there shooting and improving your photography skills?

Check out Fall in Love with Photography, a free 7 day photo challenge to kickstart your photography! Every day for one week you’ll receive a new photo challenge right to your inbox. Each challenge features a theme with plenty of tips and ideas to get your creativity flowing. Enter your name and email below to get started!

Ready to fall in love with photography? Join the free photo challenge today!

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Have you ever heard of the exposure triangle? It sounds a little like a math equation, let me explain.

The exposure triangle stands for three elements affecting the exposure of a photograph. If you’re struggling with how to shoot in manual mode, use the exposure triangle as a guide to help you. You can change each one of these variables with your camera to create a different effect.

These three elements of a photograph are:

So let’s break down these three elements a little further to understand how each affects your photos.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Aperture

Aperture, also known as an F-stop, is how large of an opening you let light through in your photo.

A stop refers to doubling or halving the amount of light making up an exposure. Adding a stop of light by doubling the exposure will brighten an image. Decreasing by one stop or halving the exposure will darken an image.

Related post: What is aperture? | A Beginner’s guide to understanding aperture

Here’s a few examples of f-stops you may see on your camera:

  • f/1.4
  • f/2
  • f/2.8
  • f/4
  • f/5.6
  • f/8
  • f/11
  • f/16
  • f/22

So here’s the confusing part. The smaller the f-stop number (think f/1.4), the larger the aperture. Seems kind of backwards right? This illustration will help you make the connection.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

So the next time you’re wondering which aperture to use in any given lighting situation just think the opposite.

Is it super bright out? Stick to a smaller aperture (f-stop numbers high like 4 and above). Is it just before sunset and the light is beginning to dim? Use a larger aperture (f-stop with smaller numbers like 2.8 and below)

An important thing to note here is your aperture is entirely dependent on the type of lens you’re using. This is why it’s important to invest in quality glass.

You’ll notice most kit lens you receive with your camera don’t go past f/4. This makes it challenging to shoot in low light situations or at night unless you lose a tripod. The larger the aperture (from f/2.8 down to f/1.4), the more light your lens will allow in to capture those night scenes.

A nice side effect of larger apertures (low f-stop numbers) is that creamy bokeh effect. Want to make your subject pop while the background fades beautifully behind? Then use those lower f-stop numbers. Here’s an example where the red rose is the subject in focus while the building is blurred into the background.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

On the other hand, if you want your whole scene to be sharp and crystal clear in focus then use a smaller aperture (large f-stop numbers). Notice how the whole scene is in focus in this example. You can see details in the grass and the Painted Ladies in the foreground as you can with San Francisco in the background.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Shutter speed

Shutter speed refers to the amount of time the shutter is open. It’s measured in seconds or fractions of a second. The bigger the denominator, the faster the feed. Example: 1/1000 is a much faster shutter speed than 1/30.

Unless you’re using a tripod you’ll most likely want to stay above 1/60 or 1/125 to be safe.

When you’re wondering what shutter speed to use think about the movement of your scene. The best example I can use to explain this is if you’re capturing a waterfall.

If you want to freeze the water you’ll use a higher shutter speed (think 1/1000 and above). If you want to create motion blur where the water looks silky smooth, you’ll want to have a lower shutter sleep (think 1/15). Here’s an example of a waterfall I shot using a lower shutter speed to show the motion blur of the water.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

But again, remember you’ll need something to stabilize your camera like a tripod otherwise your whole image will be blurry if you go beyond 1/125 while handholding your camera.

You can also create some interesting effects at night with low shutter speeds. This is called lightpainting when you use light to essentially “paint” while the the shutter of your camera is open. Here are more photos of lightpainting with the pixelstick.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

ISO

Back in the days of film photography ISO was how sensitive film was to light. It’s measured in numbers like 100, 200, 400, 800, and so on. You actually had to choose one for a whole roll of 36 exposures. Now we’re lucky to have the option to change for each photo.

The lower the number, the lower the sensitivity of the film and the finer grain. And the reverse, the higher the number the more noticeable the grain.

In general, lower ISOs are used for bright, sunny days and higher ISO for darker situations like at night.

A note to remember: the higher the number (say 3200) the noisier or grainier the image will appear. Most people don’t like this look but it can create an interesting affect if it’s part of your style.

Here’s an example of a photo I took in San Francisco at night with a super high ISO. It has that old school, vintage vibe I love to create in my photos.

The Exposure Triangle: How to Use it to Create Better Photos with Your DSLR Camera

Now that you’ve learned more about the exposure triangle, how will you use this to improve your photos while shooting in manual mode? Let me know what is your biggest takeaway from this post!

 

Types of Signage Photography

Types of Signage Photography

Signage Photography: The 12 Shots You Need to Capture

12 types of signage photography

Signage, the words around us, is a new genre of photography emerging. I’ve shared about my love affair with signage photography. I studied graphic design in art school where typography is a core focus. You’ll notice several mentions of typography in this post so I’ll quickly define it first.

Typography is the style, arrangement, or appearance of letters. These letters can be on a printed page like a book or a poster, or digitally on a screen like a webpage or an app. It’s the art and technique of arranging type to make written language legible, readable, and appealing when displayed.

My love for design is a key influence in my style of photography. I notice it wherever I go and I love capturing it in new ways. Today I’m diving deeper into the types of signage we see in our everyday lives. My goal is to show you how diverse the signage around us is and give you ideas along the way for you to capture on your next photo adventure.

Script signage

Probably one of the most popular lettering types, everyone loves a good script. Script can be simple with one fluid stroke or decorative and full of flourished embellishments. Formal scripts began their debut in the early 1700s by writing masters and engravers such as George Bickham, George Shelley, and George Snell.

The letters originated from a quill or metal nib pen forming thick and thin strokes. There are plenty of wonderful script typefaces out there but the most intriguing include original letterforms. Check out these examples of script signage photography.

Types of Signage Photography: ScriptTypes of Signage Photography: ScriptTypes of Signage Photography: Script

Elegant serif signage

By definition, a serif is a small decorative line added as an embellishment to the basic form of a character. One of the most common serif typefaces is Times New Roman, usually included in every word processor on your computer. But don’t be fooled by this common typeface, there are many examples of elegant serif signage out there like those shown below.

Types of Signage Photography: Elegant SerifTypes of Signage Photography: Elegant SerifTypes of Signage Photography: Elegant Serif

Vintage signage

Antique and vintage signs are quite popular these days, entering a new trend. They advertise anything from soda fountains to household appliances and more. This type of signage tends to be more creative in mediums such as porcelain, wood, tin, and neon.

What’s most intriguing about this type of signage is when you see it you’re immediately transported to another time and place. People always yearn for times of the past and it’s one reason we connect with vintage signage. Take a look at these signs for some inspiration on your vintage hunt.

Types of Signage Photography: Vintage Types of Signage Photography: Vintage Types of Signage Photography: Vintage

Big and bold san serif signage

Big and bold sans serif signs are the complete opposite of the elegant serif signs shown above. A typeface without a serif is called sans serif, from the French sans meaning “without”. In print, most headlines use sans serif typefaces while serif typefaces are used for body copy. One of the most common san serif typefaces you’ll find on your computer is Arial.

It’s modern, it’s hip, and always good for a statement. See if you can spot examples of big and bold sans serif signage in your city like these.

Types of Signage Photography: Big and Bold Sans Serif Types of Signage Photography: Big and Bold Sans Serif

Helvetica signage

Speaking of Arial and other sans serifs, Helvetica is arguable the most popular typeface out there or at least the most well-known. There’s even a documentary on the infamous typeface and clever merchandise all over the internet. People either love it or hate it. Here’s a few examples of Helvetica signage out in the open.

Types of Signage Photography: Helvetica Types of Signage Photography: Helvetica

Script and sans serif signage

Most of the above examples are based on one typeface but the magic happens when you combine two styles to create something new. When you capture the elegant and unique qualities of a script and add the bold and modern qualities of sans serif, you get dynamic signage like those included in these shots.

Types of Signage Photography: Script and Sans SerifTypes of Signage Photography: Script and Sans SerifTypes of Signage Photography: Script and Sans Serif

Decorative signage

Decorative and display typefaces in signage are playful and fun, just about anything is fair game. They became popular in the 19th century in posters and advertisements. The trick is to use decorative typefaces sparingly so as not to lose their artistic and eye-catching effect. They’re perfect for an accent, a heading, or title. Take a look at these distinct decorative styled signage.

Types of Signage Photography: Decorative Types of Signage Photography: Decorative

Vertical signage

Rather than based on a single typeface, vertical signage relates to the orientation they’re displayed in. We’re used to seeing most signage in a horizontal format like a billboard but many buildings (especially theatres) use vertical signs for interest. Signage with vertically stacked letters are ideal for shorter names to ease the reader’s eye. They’re also easier to see from afar like these beauties.

Types of Signage Photography: VerticalTypes of Signage Photography: Vertical Types of Signage Photography: Vertical

Modern signage

The term modern is thrown around a lot these days and can posses several meanings. Here we’ll use the definition of “relating to present or recent types as opposed to the remote past”. These examples of signage shown modern characteristics for their style in typography, use of materials, and minimal color palette.

Types of Signage Photography: Modern Types of Signage Photography: Modern

Marquee / theatre signage

A favorite genre of mine is the marquee and/or theatre signage. A marquee sign is commonly placed over a theatre to present the play, movie, or artist appearing at the venue. Since the turnover is quick, these signs need to adapt easily, sometimes daily. Like the Scrabble tiles you use in a game, letters can be moved around to form new words giving a cut and paste aesthetic feel to your photos like this one.

Types of Signage Photography: Marquee / Theatre Types of Signage Photography: Marquee / Theatre

Painted signage

Sign painting is the art of painting on buildings, billboards, or signboards to announce or advertise products, services, or events. Original, hand painted signs are also making a comeback with a huge demand for lettering artists. For this genre the sky is the limit, no two signs are the same.

Types of Signage Photography: PaintedTypes of Signage Photography: Painted

Informational signage

Last but not least is informational signage. By far the most important type of signage as it helps guide us in the right direction. Whether it’s a street sign for which freeway to enter or exit to take, we depend on clear signage to avoid getting lost.

Types of Signage Photography: InformationalTypes of Signage Photography: Informational Types of Signage Photography: Informational

 


 

Want to download the checklist for the 12 signage photography shots you need to capture? Fill in the form below and I’ll send it to you!


 

And here’s an infographic to summarize these 12 types of signage photography:12 Types of Signage Photography

 


What do you think of this list of 12 different types of signage photography? Which ones have you already tried and which will you try next?

San Francisco Ocean Beach

San Francisco Ocean Beach

San Francisco Ocean Beach

Ocean Beach, San Francisco

Ocean Beach is unlike any other beach in California. San Francisco is the perfect sweater weather. It rarely gets too hot and it’s usually breezy enough for wearing layers. This makes walking along Ocean Beach a unique experience just like this foggy, overcast day. The moody sky, the crisp cool air, and the bonfire flames crackling in the distance, it’s not your average picture of sunny California.

San Francisco Ocean Beach

The perfect escape from city life

Ocean Beach is a 3.5 miles of white sand stretched along the entire west coast of San Francisco, the widest and most expansive beach in the city. Seagulls fly over as the waves of the Pacific ocean flow in and out in a rhythm.It’s the perfect escape from the busyness of the city. There’s plenty of space to sit and admire the view, a must see for sunsets. The Great Highway runs along the beach joining Sutro Baths and the Cliff House from the north end to the San Francisco Zoo on the south end.

San Francisco Ocean Beach map

Usually you’ll catch a few surfers in the distance. If you’re a swimmer avoid getting into the water for its dangerous rip currents. The coldness of the water will numb you immediately with its cold temperatures ranging from 53-57°F year round.

San Francisco Ocean Beach

The chilled weather of typical San Francisco adds to the cool tones in this Instax mini exposure of Ocean Beach.

San Francisco Ocean BeachSan Francisco Ocean BeachSan Francisco Ocean BeachSan Francisco Ocean Beach

 


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